VIEWS OF THE
MOUNTAIN FROM MOSHI

My last day in Tanzania was spent in Moshi. While some people had been there for days and not actually seen the mountain. I was lucky: I saw Kili at sunset and sunrise!

GUARDIAN IN THE
FOREST OF THE MISTS

As we climbed higher on Kilimanjaro, the mists grew thicker and the light dimmer. The air was heavy and visibility low. It wasn't the hike I expected, but it was still stunning.

THE FLOWERS
OF KILIMANJARO

I was climbing the Marangu route to the Mandara hut. Along the way, we found a pretty rare Kilimanjaro impatiens flower - with a little green bug in it.

MAINTAINING TRADITION
AMIDST GLOBALIZATION

I was welcomed into the home of the main leader of this boma. We stepped in - I was the farthest one inside - in their kitchen.

PENS AND WALLS
OF ACACIA THORNS

There are four or five smaller pens that are off to each side in the second rung -- this is where the goats or donkeys are kept, separated by family.

JOURNEY TO THE
MAASAI BOMA

On our second day in Enduimet Wildlife Management Area (WMA), we ate breakfast with the goats and packed up our campsites. We were headed to a local Maasai village, also known as a boma.

BUT STILL, LIKE DUST,
I’ll RISE

I’ve never seen anything like this dust. So light that at a footstep it poofs into the air. So invasive that it leaks through car windows and into closed bags and your lungs.

CITY OF ARUSHA,
MOMENT BY MOMENT

Near our workplace, along the dirt street with the small butcher shop and music store, were several murals. I wish that I had captured more and walked the street more slowly.

MARVELING AT
THE HERDS OF AFRICA

We watched the giraffe for a good 20 minutes. At first, there were only two. They were looking intensely to the right, as several more walked out of the canyon.

ELEPHANT HERD
UNDER THE ACACIA

These moments were magical. We were struck with how the elephants approached us, especially the young ones.

CHASING LIONS
ACROSS THE SAVANNAH

At the campfire the night before, our little group heard about some lions the tourists had seen earlier that day. We asked them if they could find the lions again.

LIFE AND DEATH
ON THE FLOODPLAINS

Our second day in Tarangire started with an early morning Cape Buffalo herd. The landscape here was epic. Empty savannahs, gnarled trees, thin stretches of water.

SUNSET SIGHTS
ON THE WAY TO CAMP

The light was a deep red. The air was peaceful. The mighty leafless Baobab trees standing guard over the savannah.

LUNCH TIME
OVERLOOKING TARANGIRE

Our lunch spot for our first day in Tarangire was perched above a beautiful river and what felt like the entirety of the park (it wasn't).

PAMOJA, OR
HOW TO LIVE TOGETHER

We were wide-eyed with cameras flashing the entire afternoon, passing my binoculars back and forth to get closer looks.

SAFARI UNDER
GREY SKIES

We found a central watering hole where we sat and watched as a small herd of zebras and wildebeest ventured in to drink. It was stunning.

SEX ED
IN SWAHILI

While there were some giggles, the instructor mostly discussed the causes of early pregnancy: poverty, distance from home to school, peer groups, rape.

WHERE THE
BABOONS RULE

As we journeyed up and out, we passed an entire troop of Olive baboons on the move. They were curious, but confident.

THE GREAT EXPANSE
OF NGORONGORO

This was where the expanse of the crater really came to view. It was stark and beautiful. The intense sun beat down on the quietly grazing wildlife.

THE BIRDS OF
NGORONGORO CRATER

There were so many different species, sizes and colors among the brush of Ngorongoro: rainbow and dull, tiny and large, strutting and flitting about.

ACTION NEAR
THE WATER

Many animals hang around water in Ngorongoro - we stumbled upon more than a few hippos, as well as a lion couple.

THE REAL SAFARI
FINALLY BEGINS

We perched ourselves on a ridge overlooking an expansive green river. Two elephants, far off, trekked toward it. I felt like we were in Jurassic Park.

DESCENT INTO
THE VOLCANIC CALDERA

I wasn't prepared for Ngorongoro Crater. The morning air was cool on our way down as we passed villages and zebra in the distance.

THE ELEPHANTS’ THICKET
AT SUNSET

Our group marveled at the elephants' quiet chomping and slow movements, giggling at the baby elephant.

BIRDS AND MONKEYS
OF LAKE MANYARA

There were thousands of cranes - so many that the entire forest of trees was white from their perched bodies. It was loud, and spectacular.

RUINS TO RICHES
IN OUR LAST DAY

There's so much I love about being among the ruins of Rome, as they stretch across the continents. Amazingly, there were storks among the ruins as well.

A WALKING TOUR
THROUGH THE MEDINA

Just like Marrakech, the souks in Fes were windy, narrow and bustling. We visited artisans practicing their various crafts, from weaving to tanning to mosaics.

BARBARY MACAQUES
ON THE ROAD

Before reaching Fes, we passed through a forest in the middle Atlas where, quite suddenly, Ismail spotted some Barbary macaques.

DESERT DEPARTURE
AS THE SUN RISES

We were the last ones to leave our encampment, just a couple of us, and our jeep was packed to the brim with the Berber folks who worked with us. They even climbed on the side.

ON THE EDGE
OF THE SAHARA

The Sahara started as a faint orange on the horizon. There's someplace that deserts have to start, and I guess this was it.

WATCHER ON
THE ROAD

The sheer cliffs and rocky river of the sparse Dadès Gorge had little traffic. The sun was setting, and there was an immense quietude.

DESCENT AMONG
THE KASBAHS

Once a prominent caravan stop, now only eight Berber families remain living inside the ancient fortress walls. They are the caretakers.

WALKING THROUGH
A CRUMBLING IGHREM

When we reached the top, you could see the painted hills all around us and just marveled at where we were standing, looking at the new town across the river.

FROM THE MOUNTAINS
TO THE DESERT

The high Atlas Mountains were sparse and dusty, with a lot of construction work and a caravan of vehicles trekking up and up.

SUNBURNT TOMBS
AND MINT TEA

Eventually, the swallows swam around us as the evening prayer was marked by the mosque loudspeakers across the entire city.

VIEWS OF THE
GRANDER PALACE

Some courtyards were lush and overrun with plant life -- others were massive and bare, yet still tiled in greens and blues.

EXPLORING THE RUINED
KORANIC SCHOOL

For four hundred years, the voices of 900 Marrakech children reverberated against the Moorish architecture of the Koranic school.

DEEP BLUE
GARDEN TONES

Far outside the city center in the newer part of Marrakech, is the Jardin Majorelle, a garden built in the 1900s and later bought by Yves Saint-Laurent.

IN AND OUT OF
THE SOUKS

The Souks dominate Marrakech life. They are markets, homes, shops. Over the course of a couple of days, we wound in and out of them.

ANGLES OF A
RUINED PALACE

The "incomparable" Palais el-Badi was once a wonder of the Muslim world. Today - and since 1683 - the palace has lain in ruins.

THE STORKS WHO
RULE MARRAKECH

We were amazed when we sat down on the third story of Cafe Restaurant Nid Cigogne near Palais el-Badi and looked across the square. A stork's nest.

MORNING WALK
OUT THE CITY

In the middle of the Souks in Marrakech, our peaceful, tiled riad was a sanctuary. From the rooftop terrace, we could see the entire city.